Socialist Thatcherism

cremeegg

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How long would it take for the following private organisations to do a bad job before they went out of business:

AIB
Dunnes Stores
CRH
Greyhound Waste

Dunnes, I don't know months rather than years I'd guess. Lipton, Five Star, Tesco Mk1, Quinnsworth, Superquinn all disappeared .

CRH. An Irish started, owned and run aggregates company that its the biggest supplier in the US South West, they must be doing something right. But if they weren't they too would be out of business.

AIB. The state bailed AIB management and probably would do so again, an absolute failure to enforce competition. Which is not to say that the state had a better option at the time. It is seldom recognised that AIB shareholders were wiped out. Perhaps they will enforce better oversight on management next time.

Geryhound waste. Haven't they been given a monopoly by the local authority because the LA wasn't able to collect the bins. I must admit I know little about them.

Competition is not a panacea!
I disagree. Under certain circumstances it is difficult to enforce competition or its consequences, but where it exists it is effective.
Bad public sector organisations should be forced to learn from good ones, although this is hard to achieve.
Certainly, but where competition is the rule with some exceptions in the private sector, public sector organisations spreading best practice is rare.

Revenue's introduction of ROS was a huge success, but the HSE can't or won't introduce electronic health records, and there is no mechanism to compel them or replace them with an organisation that can or would.
 

Sophrosyne

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In fairness, I think Revenue is and always was technologically way ahead of the posse. A retired Revenue Assistant Secretary told me once that Revenue introduced a pilot for computerized records in the 1960s and rolled it out in the early 1970s!

I note that some hospital consultants in the HSE now maintain electronic records. It's a start I suppose.

It suggests huge cultural differences between the Revenue service and the current/former Health services.
 

PMU

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957
Revenue's introduction of ROS was a huge success,
Three cheers for Accenture that did all the work.
but the HSE can't or won't introduce electronic health records, and there is no mechanism to compel them or replace them with an organisation that can or would.
No one will do this. If you think PPARS and the NCH were disasters, in 2002 the UK attempted to introduce a state of the art health record system. https://www.centreforpublicimpact.org/case-study/electronic-health-records-system-uk/. Technically this was a brilliant system. It was also a very expensive flop. So when you mention 'health records', no one will touch it. It is too risky for your career.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

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Firefly

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In fairness, I think Revenue is and always was technologically way ahead of the posse. A retired Revenue Assistant Secretary told me once that Revenue introduced a pilot for computerized records in the 1960s and rolled it out in the early 1970s!
It's amazing how efficient the government can be when it comes to collecting money...
 

cremeegg

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PPARS was done by trying to design a system that met every user requirement, some of which requirements were only identified long after the development had begun. (Just like the NCH Really)

With ROS, Revenue developed a robust system that addressed many but not all user requirements. Then users were persuaded and ultimately forced to adopt ROS, if there were issues they had to be sorted by the user conforming to ROS.

If the HSE try to build an all singing all dancing medical records system, they will fail. If they build a simple robust system, and get users, GPS, Consultants, hospitals, moving on to it in their own time that will work. Expanding outwards from a stable core. Patients will not be long demanding that their records are there.
 
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