Bond rates

galway_blow_in

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Bond returns are not the same thing as Bond yields.

Your fathers bond fund is doing well because bond prices have risen, the yield moves inversely with the price.

If a bond paying €2 interest per annum was bought for €90 that is a yield of 2.2%

If your father owned that bond and the price increased to €95, then your father has done well, he has made a 5.55% return (approx it is a bit more complicated that that, the bonds maturity has shortened).

However the yield has fallen to 2.1%

In any normal world a bond with a negative yield would not exist, yet at present some bonds do in fact have negative yields.

The room for bond prices generally to rise further without moving into negative yield territory is small.
Is that not like saying if I bought a property for 100 k with a rent of 10k per annum, the yield is 10%, yet in time if the value of the property increases in value to 150k, I'm only yielding sub 7%

The income is still the same regardless, the yield to the original purchase price is what matters from an investment POV, is it not?
 

cremeegg

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Is that not like saying if I bought a property for 100 k with a rent of 10k per annum, the yield is 10%, yet in time if the value of the property increases in value to 150k, I'm only yielding sub 7%

The income is still the same regardless, the yield to the original purchase price is what matters from an investment POV, is it not?
It is exactly like that.

You have a property with a value of €150k and an income of €10k, thats a yield of 6.67% on your asset.

While there are major transaction costs associated with property, bonds are bought and sold at the press of a button.
 

galway_blow_in

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It is exactly like that.

You have a property with a value of €150k and an income of €10k, thats a yield of 6.67% on your asset.

While there are major transaction costs associated with property, bonds are bought and sold at the press of a button.

If i purchased a house for 100k and its delivering 10k per annum NET, provided the rent remains at 10k, I consider I'm getting a 10% yield no matter what price the house is worth in a few years

Obviously bonds are a different asset in many ways but focusing on yield specifically, that's my reasoning
 

joe sod

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very interesting and explanatory artice. I like this paragraph

"It was true that, in the main, developed countries found that they could run deficits without being punished by the markets. Indeed, eventually, they found that they could depreciate their exchange rates without being penalised by their creditors in the form of higher yields. This was an easy option in the short-term. But it was a bit like the 25-year old who boasts that smoking, drinking and overeating hasn't harmed him; the bad habits will catch up with him eventually. "
and
"Bubbles are very hard intellectually to deal with. Those who ride the bubble look smart; those who try to buck it, like the late Tony Dye, get fired. "

Im thinking of the banks here surely there must be dissenting voices within the financial sector about the wisdom of loading up on so much government debt especially at negative interest rates. I suppose they feel they cant speak up after being bailed out by the likes of the irish government, but the bonds issued by the irish government to bail out the banks is owned buy those very same banks. You couldn't make it up.
 

joe sod

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700
The madness accelerates, the Irish government latest bond release dipped negative , its one thing to pay the German government to loan your money too but the Irish government !!!
Remember this is the same government that could not get the markets to lend them money a decade ago even at high interest rates relatively.
It appears that the bond markets no longer care about risk because everyone gets the money at zero interest rates no matter what their track record. Remember bond holders are now "bailed in" when the next crisis hits
 
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