Timber Frame (2003) Party Wall Construction

Lone Star

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A 2003 Semi D - In the process of installing soundproofing in one bedroom which is one room subject to noise from the other semi D that I need to address. We have checked the construction; Separating us and next door - or rather joining us! is approx. 23cm [2 layers of plasterboard, looks slim~10mm each, 75mm stud and yellow insulation, 8mm woodboard, 1cm air space, 8mm woodboard, 75mm stud and then the same again 2 layers of plasterboard on the neighbour's side]. Anyone we have mentioned it to - from the acoustics people, to the window fitters to the plumber are really surprised there is no brick in between us and next door. I have checked with a friend who does fire investigations - in particular re the attic - as it is only plasterboard and stud - no insulation and no timber and some gaps at the sides - he said that this offers 60 minutes fire protection and doesn't see an issue. Any thoughts? Next port of call the relevant SIs for the local authority.
 

Drakon

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Not uncommon, I’d say.
The biggest Celtic Tiger estate in my home town, of timber frame houses, used both sides of a semi-d for for their show houses. After a few days they closed one of the show houses and opened up a different show house along the close.
Why?
Because viewers in one show house could hear the conversations of viewers in the other show house next door.

As an aside... the developer in question, a car salesman, is back selling cars again.
He bought a 1930s mansion during the boom and kitted it out with high end period furnishings. The replacement sash windows alone cost €260,000.
After years of obfuscation, he was forced to sell the house. For €260,000! The same as had cost him for the windows.
One row of the houses in the estate, known locally as Legoland, have been demolished due to dodgy foundations.
The council bought two dozen for €40k a pop (despite an alternative EA offering them for €35k).
2003, eh?!
 

kceire

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A 2003 Semi D - In the process of installing soundproofing in one bedroom which is one room subject to noise from the other semi D that I need to address. We have checked the construction; Separating us and next door - or rather joining us! is approx. 23cm [2 layers of plasterboard, looks slim~10mm each, 75mm stud and yellow insulation, 8mm woodboard, 1cm air space, 8mm woodboard, 75mm stud and then the same again 2 layers of plasterboard on the neighbour's side]. Anyone we have mentioned it to - from the acoustics people, to the window fitters to the plumber are really surprised there is no brick in between us and next door. I have checked with a friend who does fire investigations - in particular re the attic - as it is only plasterboard and stud - no insulation and no timber and some gaps at the sides - he said that this offers 60 minutes fire protection and doesn't see an issue. Any thoughts? Next port of call the relevant SIs for the local authority.
That is standard Timber Frame Party Wall construction. It offers 60 minutes fire rating and is in compliance with all Building Regulations from that time.

The only difference to TF party walls nowadays is the addition of extra sound proofing to comply with the newer requirements for TGD Part E (Sound).
 

Lone Star

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thanks kceire - yes an engineer friend told me the same 60 mins of fire protection. UPDATE: The sound we have investigated - I took off the skirting and tape on the plasterboard corners - gaps - of up to a cm the whole way around - so the sound had lots of opportunity to get through. Anyhow, sourced rubber based soundproofing material from a company in Monaghan - it's made in Italy - we fixed that to the wall, used acoustic sealant, then three layers of plasterboard - acoustic board, then regular (thicker one) then the acoustic one again - each sheet weighed 35kg. End result!!!!! Success!! can't hear a thing - wall was say 8ft high by 12ft foot - overall cost - labour materials 1000. pricey for one bedroom - but well worth it. we can still hear the odd jump when the woman next door leaps out of her bed onto their laminate - so to counteract that vibration noise - we could infill the joists - but for now we can live with that! apart from when she opens the windows - we hear the baby crying - we can live with than anyhow and acoustic glazing has been ordered and due to be installed shortly which will also we hope block out the neighbours chickens and the other neighbours new cockerel that they still claim is a hen!!! Happy days anyhow and money well spent. :)
 
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