Key Post Things to consider when making a will

NewEdition

Frequent Poster
Messages
216
This is something I need to sort out in 2020, some good info in this post.

I may not need my own will executed for many decades (I hope)
I dont "have" a solicitor as such, it would be a matter of ringing around and getting the best price so not like I would keep in touch with the solicitor, send xmas cards etc.
How can I have the peace of mind that the solicitor qill do their job when my time comes?
What if the solicitor goes out of business in the meantime?
What if I outlive the solicitor?

It makes more sense for me to write my own will using the guidelines above I think, especially as my on circumstances are not so complicated.
 

Thirsty

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,153
You don't have to appoint a Solicitor as an executor.

If a solicitor leaves / retires / dies, they either pass the clients to another solicitor in the same firm, or recommend another firm or the files go to the Law Society.

Getting a solicitor to write a will costs far less than an emergency plumber.

Trying to save such a small amount of money for assets that most likely are worth at least 1000 times more than the fee is bonkers.
 
Last edited:

SlurrySlump

Frequent Poster
Messages
521
Is it advisable not to name grandchildren when making a will, rather to leave €x to all grandchildren if you want all to benefit equally, including those who may be pregnant with grand child at time of death?
 

mf1

Frequent Poster
Messages
4,260
A Will speaks from the date of death.

An unborn grand child won't benefit unless you specify so- but you'd need to be pretty specific.

mf
 

Thirsty

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,153
Depending on the value of the bequest, there may be inheritance tax to be paid if your grandchildren are beneficiaries, as they fall into Group B.
 

mf1

Frequent Poster
Messages
4,260
Just following on from the above........ and with thanks to the person who pointed this out to me

S. 3.2 of the Succession Act says as follows:

(2) Descendants and relatives of a deceased person begotten before his death but born alive thereafter shall, for the purposes of this Act, be regarded as having been born in the lifetime of the deceased and as having survived him.

mf
 

Thirsty

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,153
Not an expert in this field, but I believe that is the definition of an embryo. A 'non-fertilised' product would be an egg.
 

Ravima

Frequent Poster
Messages
2,499
False economy not to use a solicitor. Its great value for such an important document. I had a relative who used an accountant to do his will and none of the beneficiaries were happy. He appointed as executor, a sibling who had Alzheimers. We ended up in High Court and fees of €16K to sort matters out. And this was with all beneficiaries in agreement!!!
 
Top