HR won't provide clarification on paid paternity leave!?

Leo

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I know that it makes no business sense to have drastically different benefits for employees in a certain jurisdiction as that demotivates staff and drives staff turnover, which is what's happening anyway.
How many people are leaving to go work in the UK office?
 

dereko1969

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Most other legal entities, which are based in other countries, offer good benefits, including paid paternity leave. HR UK, that we deal with, don't respond to simple questions and don't deal with my request, which is why I escalated it. Statutory seems to be the only option available to Irish employees right now which I won't be applying for.

It's a good suggestion you make about asking the director to confirm the paid paternity leave although I do know that the site manager and director are actively working to negotiate benefits for Irish employees so that there will be equality in the workplace. This may not be done in time for the birth of our baby.
Why won't you apply for Statutory?
 

Nutso

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I was going to ask you the same question regarding applying for statutory. Even if your company has a paid paternity policy, the likelihood is that they will either top up statutory paternity or ask you to sign your statutory paternity to them. You have nothing to gain by not applying for it.
 

Purple

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You are entitled to statutory paternity leave. If your employer tops up (pays) statutory maternity leave and does not top up statutory maternity leave then they are discriminating against male employees.
 

PatrickSmithUS

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In typically Irish fashion if you apply twice within two years you have to do it manually, not online, the second time due to a long standing 'glitch' on civil service databases.
 

ivorystraws

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I was going to ask you the same question regarding applying for statutory. Even if your company has a paid paternity policy, the likelihood is that they will either top up statutory paternity or ask you to sign your statutory paternity to them. You have nothing to gain by not applying for it.
Yea, that's true. It's no harm in applying for it.
 

ivorystraws

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You are entitled to statutory paternity leave. If your employer tops up (pays) statutory maternity leave and does not top up statutory maternity leave then they are discriminating against male employees.
Yea I know I'm entitled to statutory paternity leave but that's paid for by the Irish government and my employer is obliged to provide this option. It doesn't cost my employer anything.
 

Purple

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Yea I know I'm entitled to statutory paternity leave but that's paid for by the Irish government and my employer is obliged to provide this option. It doesn't cost my employer anything.
If your employer tops up (pays) statutory maternity leave and does not top up statutory maternity leave then they are discriminating against male employees.
 

llgon

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You are entitled to statutory paternity leave. If your employer tops up (pays) statutory maternity leave and does not top up statutory maternity leave then they are discriminating against male employees.
Purple, I'd have my doubts about that but it's not clear cut. Discussed already in this thread:


Not wanting to take this thread off-topic I would just point out that female employees can also have an entitlement to paternity leave.
 
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Leo

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No, they're leaving the company to go work elsewhere.
Assuming package/ compensation is a major factor in their decision to leave, then it is a reflection on the overall compensation between the company you work for, and wherever they choose to leave for.
 

Purple

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Not wanting to take this thread off-topic I would just point out that female employees can also have an entitlement to paternity leave.
Indeed, as men can be entitled to maternity leave in the even of the death of the mother.
 
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