Electric Heaters

eisfspike

Registered User
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Hi All,

Can anyone recommend an energy efficient electric heater for a large room? I know all electric heaters are efficent as they convert all energy to heat but I am wondering if I am better going for a storage heater (if they are still around) and letting it charge up over night? Are the electric heaters still very costly to run or have they improved in recent years does anyone know

Thanks
 

elcato

Moderator
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3,174
I bought a Lucht 1200w heater for about 480 a few years ago. They are a simple plugin all the time ones that heat day and night which cost the same roughly as a storage heater - about 1 euro a day. The beauty is that you can switch them on/off immediately rather than wait 24 hours.
 

eisfspike

Registered User
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22
Thanks a million. How long would you have it on for the €1 a day price? This would be on in the evenings only. Thanks
 

elcato

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I leave it on all day as it regulates itself once the desired temp is reached. I tried using a timer for a few hours before I came home and early in the morning but the savings wasn't that spectacular.
 

SparkRite

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1,174
Storage heaters generally are still the most cost effective electric heaters, as you can avail of cheaper night rate electricity to charge them.
They still lack the 'control' that instant heaters offer but most/all offer a mid day boost if needed on colder days.
 

fizzy

Frequent Poster
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123
In terms of thermal comfort, the lucht heaters are a world apart from storage heaters. They feel like proper central heating & work on demand which is much better. No more expensive to run than storage / panel heaters & possibly a bit cheaper depending on occupancy etc. All electric heating is still expensive mind.
 

NoRegretsCoyote

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792
I bought a Lucht 1200w heater for about 480 a few years ago. They are a simple plugin all the time ones that heat day and night which cost the same roughly as a storage heater - about 1 euro a day. The beauty is that you can switch them on/off immediately rather than wait 24 hours.
It depends on your lifestyle

In my 20s I house shared in a rental. I had a small bedroom and wasn't home much, and not predictably. All I did in the kitchen was cook, which tended to heat the place up.

I had a 1000w plug-in heater which had the room comfortably warm in about 15 minutes. This was cheaper than using storage heaters which were on when I wasn't around.
 

Leo

Moderator
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10,266
In terms of thermal comfort, the lucht heaters are a world apart from storage heaters.
Are you saying you the heat from one feels different to the heat from another?

In relation to cost, the on-demand heaters will cost roughly twice as much to produce the same amount of heat as a storage heater, as there is little to nothing between them in terms of efficiency. The difference will come in your usage patterns, and it's that which should drive a decision on which is best for a particular scenario.
 

fizzy

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Are you saying you the heat from one feels different to the heat from another?

In relation to cost, the on-demand heaters will cost roughly twice as much to produce the same amount of heat as a storage heater, as there is little to nothing between them in terms of efficiency. The difference will come in your usage patterns, and it's that which should drive a decision on which is best for a particular scenario.
Yes, the heat feels like proper central heating rather than the dry, stuffy heat traditional electric heaters give.

Plus vs storage heaters, it's a constant heat on demand rather than the nightly build up & then inflexible day output.

The lucht heaters are designed to only use electricity for around half the time they are on, with a ceramic panel that holds the heat better than panel heaters & they have a thermostat to set the temp too.

Honestly, they are a different ball game from traditional electric heaters & make the world of difference if you are stuck with electric heating.
 

Leo

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Yes, the heat feels like proper central heating rather than the dry, stuffy heat traditional electric heaters give.
Radiant heat is radiant heat, any perceived differences will be psychological. Some storage and other electric heaters include fans to add a convection element, this can have a drying effect. Radiant heaters will promote a certain amount of convection also as warm air rises to be replaced by cooler. The Lucht heaters use an increased surface area of fins to encourage more convection.

Plus vs storage heaters, it's a constant heat on demand rather than the nightly build up & then inflexible day output.
That's where the usage pattern comes into play. If the house is occupied most of the day, storage heaters will offer a significantly cheaper option assuming they are sized and set up properly.

The lucht heaters are designed to only use electricity for around half the time they are on, with a ceramic panel that holds the heat better than panel heaters & they have a thermostat to set the temp too.
That's the way pretty much any electrical heater will work. Lucht and a number of other brands use ceramic plates to build a thermal mass, other materials are used also, but the material makes no difference to the quality of the heat, just the rate is dissipates at. Oil is a better medium than ceramic for stabilising the cycling effect of the heating/ cooling cycle, but they are bulkier.
 

fizzy

Frequent Poster
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Radiant heat is radiant heat, any perceived differences will be psychological. Some storage and other electric heaters include fans to add a convection element, this can have a drying effect. Radiant heaters will promote a certain amount of convection also as warm air rises to be replaced by cooler. The Lucht heaters use an increased surface area of fins to encourage more convection.



That's where the usage pattern comes into play. If the house is occupied most of the day, storage heaters will offer a significantly cheaper option assuming they are sized and set up properly.



That's the way pretty much any electrical heater will work. Lucht and a number of other brands use ceramic plates to build a thermal mass, other materials are used also, but the material makes no difference to the quality of the heat, just the rate is dissipates at. Oil is a better medium than ceramic for stabilising the cycling effect of the heating/ cooling cycle, but they are bulkier.
We can agree to disagree. Having suffered with traditional electric heating for a decade & then switching to mainly lucht since, the difference is far from just psychological!
 

Leo

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We can agree to disagree. Having suffered with traditional electric heating for a decade & then switching to mainly lucht since, the difference is far from just psychological!
Unless they're rewriting the laws of physics (which Lucht make no claim to do by the way), then psychology plays a role.
 

elcato

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I have had both for an extended period and I would be inclined to think the lucht is more efficient. You can set the lucht to holiday mode so that it comes on when you get back. You can also switch off if you get some warm days all of a sudden without getting caught out and having to wait 24 hours. I have no connection with them btw.
 

lledlledlled

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221
If at all possible I would avoid using electricity to heat space or water.
The only exception to this would be storage heating, but only if the space was occupied during daytime hours, and the occupants don't mind adjusting settings and timers occasionally
 

NoRegretsCoyote

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792
If at all possible I would avoid using electricity to heat space or water.
Gas has a high fixed cost and you will have an electricity connection anyway.

Electricity is obviously less efficient for space and water heating. But what if you have a small, well-insulated apartment and you are rarely home? We once lived in a second-floor, south-facing apartment and only needed the gas boiler on about four months of the year for space heating.

I'd be happy to see the sums on this if anyone has done them.
 
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lledlledlled

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Gas has a high fixed cost and you will have an electricity connection anyway.

Electricity is obviously less efficient for space and water heating. But what if you have a small, well-insulated apartment and you are rarely home? We once lived in a second-floor, south-facing apartment and only needed the gas boiler on about four months of the year for space heating.

I'd be happy to see the sums on this if anyone has done them.
If I owed the apartment, I'd install gas. If I was renting and intended moving in the short to medium term, I might consider electrical heating.
 

SDMXTWO

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101
Has anyone looked at infrared heating panels, seem to be 100% energy efficent. What I'm trying to find out is why one infrared panel brand is more expensive than another of the same wattage. At the moment looking at Klarstein Wonderwall range where a 1200w is 220€. So is you had one of those in a number of rooms and used them on and off as required surely they would be more efficient than oil/gas.
 
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Leo

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used them on and off as required surely they would be more efficient than oil/gas.
As per SparkRite's point above, don't confuse efficiency with cost effectiveness. All forms of electric heat will be close to 100% efficient, but that's not to say they will be the cheapest.

The SEAI produce regular reports comparing domestic heating fuel costs. Electric heating remains the most expensive per delivered kWh of heat energy. Where it starts to make sense is in super efficient very well insulated homes where the low demand for heat makes oil or gas more expensive.
 

SDMXTWO

Frequent Poster
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101
As per SparkRite's point above, don't confuse efficiency with cost effectiveness. All forms of electric heat will be close to 100% efficient, but that's not to say they will be the cheapest.

The SEAI produce regular reports comparing domestic heating fuel costs. Electric heating remains the most expensive per delivered kWh of heat energy. Where it starts to make sense is in super efficient very well insulated homes where the low demand for heat makes oil or gas more expensive.
We have an old 20yr boiler on kerosene with rads which are not very effective. We have an electric shower. But we have no on demand hot water at sink kitchen/bathroom when needed. As there are only 3 in the house oil is not looking at being very efficent. Looking at alternatives that can make life easier, ie. undersink on demand water heater kitch/bathroom with panel heaters in rooms that are actually being used. These can be un plugged and moved to any room as needed.

Solid fuel non boiler in kitchen.
 
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