Dentist charge more than website listed price

Poc-ar-buille

Registered User
Messages
11
Folks,

I'm getting some treatment from my dentist.

I noticed one of the charges is more than the advertised price.

The difference not huge

And only about 2% of the overall treatment cost.

I queried this and was told this is normal.

The website price of a guideline.

And individual can be charged slightly differently.

Is this acceptable?

Would you be surprised the dentist didn't concede the amount?

I can let it go. But I just think they should honour the website price. And correct it on their website.

Thanks
 
Last edited:

Palerider

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1,495
I agree, that said eg a wisdom tooth costs more to extract than a front tooth, depends on the work undertaken, was more local anaesthetic needed than usual, a second shot perhaps, were their complications, is the work complex, were X-rays required.
 

Poc-ar-buille

Registered User
Messages
11
Thing is
Haven't had the treatment yet
Dentist never mentioned anything like: this bit is over and above so we'll charge you more
 

elcato

Moderator
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3,385
I have had some extractions which took a long time and price varied. Until they see the extent they are just offering a price guide I presume. Do yu need to treatment and would it cost more if you had to go to another dentist to get a first consultation ?
 

Slim

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2,288
I have had some extractions which took a long time and price varied. Until they see the extent they are just offering a price guide I presume. Do yu need to treatment and would it cost more if you had to go to another dentist to get a first consultation ?
I would be very reluctant to cheese off a man who will be putting a drill into my mouth, especially for 2% or so. I would go elsewhere.
 

Leo

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11,074
Most of the ones I've seen advertising prices include a little small print or a mention in their T&Cs that prices will vary depending on the specifics of each case.

The fact that they have given you a quote in advance of carrying out the work means they are covered regardless. Advertised prices are generally not binding and considered an invitation to treat.
 

Westpoint

New Member
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2
I booked a Dental appointment today, I’m a medical card holder- I need some routine work and root canal. Because Ive a medical card, receptionist advised me on booking my appointment that there is now additional €25 PPE charge because of admin involved in processing medical card claim.
Does anyone know if this is above board.
 

cmalone

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411
Charge for Ppe seems reasonable - otherwise go elsewhere - have you a public dentist option ? Shop around. Obviously the hse is not paying for ppe ...
 

Peanuts20

Registered User
Messages
154
I booked a Dental appointment today, I’m a medical card holder- I need some routine work and root canal. Because Ive a medical card, receptionist advised me on booking my appointment that there is now additional €25 PPE charge because of admin involved in processing medical card claim.
Does anyone know if this is above board.
yes, and it's not for the admin, its for the additional cost of PPE, (One dentist on the news last week said it was €8 per patient), the cost of cleaning down chairs and surgery after they have finished and the fact that they can see fewer patients because of the amount of cleaning they now have to do
 

Saavy99

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390
It's a cheap extra charge considering they got no help at all from the government throughout the pandemic. It must be a real struggle for many dental practises to keep going after two months of lock down.
 

Early Riser

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743
The average salary for a dentist is over €300,000 a year so I wouldn't lose sleep worrying about them starving.
I doubt it - average practice income, maybe, from which salaries for receptionist and dental nurse are paid, plus insurance, materials/equipment and business expenses.

For comparison, the salary scale for a Senior Dental Surgeon in the HSE runs from €76k to €96K . A starting salary for a qualified dentist is around €48k.

 

Purple

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9,684
I doubt it - average practice income, maybe, from which salaries for receptionist and dental nurse are paid, plus insurance, materials/equipment and business expenses.

For comparison, the salary scale for a Senior Dental Surgeon in the HSE runs from €76k to €96K . A starting salary for a qualified dentist is around €48k.

You'll never earn as much doing the same job working for someone else as you will working for yourself, at least you shouldn't. Don't forget to add 30-40% for the HSE dentists for the value of their pension plus another 10% for their fantastic T's and C's.
 

Early Riser

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You'll never earn as much doing the same job working for someone else as you will working for yourself, at least you shouldn't. Don't forget to add 30-40% for the HSE dentists for the value of their pension plus another 10% for their fantastic T's and C's.
If the average dentist was earning "a salary" of over €300,000 they would have to be making a profit of about €100 euro per consultation (very rough back of the envelope calculation). Then add on an appropriate proportion for staff salaries, materials & equipment, insurance and business expenses . How much do you pay for a filling or scale and polish?
 

Purple

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9,684
How much do you pay for a filling or scale and polish?
Dunno; no fillings. Get them cleaned and checked once a year. I think that's €85.

I did think the pay was very high from the link I posted although, based on your €100 figure, I would think a dentist would see more than 13 people a day. If they earn €1300 a day they'll get around €300,000 a year. If each appointment is an average of 15 minutes and they work 6 hours a day they'll see 24 patients a day so they'll need to make an average of around €55 per consultation.
I'd presume a dentist makes the same sort of money as a GP and there's very few GP's who work full time earning less than €250,000 a year. It's worth remembering that the majority of GP's are women and the majority of female GP's work part time. Don't be feeling too sorry for them either.
 

Early Riser

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My routine medical appointment is usually 15 mins but dental is 30 mins. That seems general in the surgery and not just me! Also similar with previous dentists. There is no way I would be paying €85 for a 15 min slot. I think my guesstimate sums are nearer the mark than yours (and that the average dentist does not not have a "salary" over - or near - €300,000 pa). But neither of us has the figures.

I'd presume a dentist makes the same sort of money as a GP and there's very few GP's who work full time earning less than €250,000 a year
Again is this "salary" or practice income? I am sure their are many medical practices with higher income - but less GP "salary". Anyway, a dental practice is not equivalent to a GP practice.

Don't be feeling too sorry for them either.
I am not sure where this inference came from. I was just questioning the reliability and accuracy of your data source. Fake news and all that.:)
 

Purple

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9,684
Again is this "salary" or practice income? I am sure their are many medical practices with higher income - but less GP "salary".
Salary. Insider knowledge; I used to be married to one. :)
I was just questioning the reliability and accuracy of your data source. Fake news and all that.
Yep, did seem very high. Do remember all the payments from the HSE that private dentists and doctors get as well as what they charge you. Even in a private GP practice it will make up a very large chunk of their income (and the bulk of their admin).
 
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